The Bonding Tool

Bread, staple nutrition in many different cultures across the globe, is one of the world’s oldest food.

“There are people in the world so hungry, that God cannot appear to them except in the form of bread.” ― Mahatma Gandhi

Post WWII, modern agricultural technology has greatly improved food production. The introduction of infinite combinations of different flours and the usage of varying proportions of secondary ingredients in recipes have transformed a simple dough of flour and water into an assortment of shapes, sizes, and textures.

These days, the breaking of breads are not just meant for religious rituals or sustenance. Affluential societies have taken bread beyond mere nutrition; they are no longer simple and cheap. Choosing the “right” kind of bread is used to show off their social status, i.e., a person buying artisanal bread is financially secured while the person buying whatever type of bread that the current trend regards as most wholesome is a health-conscious consumer.

Did you know that Germany lays claim to over 1300 basic varieties of breads, rolls, and pastries?

Below are some of the varieties available from BreadTalk Singapore. The shop I bought from was not very organised and food name plates were missing from the counter so some of the names of the items were made up by me, can you guess which are the ones? ;-)

Charcoal Bread with Mochi and Black Glutinous Rice Filling.

Charcoal Bread with Mochi and Black Glutinous Rice Filling.

Soft Roll Snails

Soft Roll Snails

Ikan Bilis is one of the signature breads.

Ikan Bilis is one of the signature breads.

Choco Mexico

Choco Mexico

Pear Danish

Pear Danish

Coconut Tart

Coconut Tart

Berry Puff

Berry Puff

Cocoa Swirl

Cocoa Swirl

Claypot Chicken in Charcoal Bread

Claypot Chicken in Charcoal Bread

Claypot Chicken

Claypot Chicken

Ebony & Ivory

Ebony & Ivory

BreadTalk Group Limited (Chinese: 麵包新語 or 麵包物語; pinyin: Miànbāo Xīnyǔ or Miànbāo Wùyǔ) is a listed bakery based in Singapore that was founded in July 2000. It operates a chain of retail outlets through its subsidiary BreadTalk Pte Ltd, selling a wide range of bread, cakes, buns and pastries. The group has a chain of 38 retail outlets island-wide in Singapore, with presence in Malaysia, Indonesia, Thailand, Philippines, Vietnam, Sri Lanka, Hong Kong, the People’s Republic of China, Oman, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, Bahrain and India. – Wikipedia

There are many BreadTalk outlets in Singapore.

Click here to view the locations near you.

I like items 1, 2, 3, 5 and the last one from the above collection.

Item 1 is charcoal bread with mochi and black glutinous rice filling. This is sweet and has nice chewy texture. The bamboo charcoal powder used gave the flat bun its distinctive colour but it has no strong smell or taste.

Item 2 is actually soft dinner rolls with some chocolate paste rolled into crescent shapes. These are not too sweet. I liked the small bite-size for snacking in between meals.

Item 3 is one of BreadTalk’s signature buns with spicy savoury filling. I like this much better than their other signature Claypot Chicken which I found too dry and the filling bleh.

Item 5 is my all time favourite (not just from here but any bakery). I’m a sucker for soft dough and raisins.

The last item is a very light cake similar to sponge

Happy snacking :)

See other places to get your dough cravings fixed:
Baker & Cook
Barcook Bakery
Chin Mee Chin
Good Morning Nanyang Cafe

Lord Stow’s Baker (Macau)

Borek Bakehouse (Melbourne)
Gözleme @ Borek Bakehouse (Melbourne)
Cupcake Family (Melbourne)
Hopetoun (Melbourne)
Massimo’s Tigella (Melbourne)
Mart 130 (Melbourne)

Recipes:
PBT
Curry Tuna
Tuna Baguette
Singapore Brekkie

Can BreadTalk? Bread, staple nutrition in many different cultures across the globe, is one of the world’s oldest food.

Thai Noodle House @ Coronation Arcade

Thai Noodle House

Indian, Japanese and Thai food remains high on the food-we-like-to-eat-list although not necessary in that order. A fine execution of Thai cuisine dwells on the balancing of sweet, salty, sour and of course, spicy.

Thai Noodle House is the place to go for no-frills home-style Thai cuisine when Ryan and Valerie do not want to stray too far from our neighbourhood. It cost us $0.69 each in bus fare…

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Founder Bak Kut Teh Restaurant 发起人肉骨茶餐馆

Founder Bak Kut Teh 发起人肉骨茶餐馆

A couple of nights ago, I had dinner with Vanessa and Sam at Founder Bak Kut Teh (BKT) in Balestier Road. I have eaten there quite a few times but had never taken presentable photographs of the meal. Luckily, I had a chance to do so a couple of nights ago.

Whoa! You mean I have to get in line?

Whoa! You mean I have to get in line?

My children likes to eat at Founder Bah Kut Teh for several reasons. Firstly, they prefer the peppery…

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I like to clear the term Fried Hokkien Mee. My mom is Hokkien and her fried Hokkien Mee is actually braised, very much like the Johor’s style which uses sliced pork (sometimes with pork ribs), small prawns, sliced squid, nappa cabbage or mustard greens with flat yellow egg noodles as shown in the picture below.

Hokkien Mee in Malaysia is braised with black soy sauce. It is a Must Eat when in Malaysia!

Hokkien Mee in Malaysia is braised with black soy sauce.
It is a Must Eat when in Malaysia!
My mom’s Boon Mee is very much like this Johor version.

Johorians use the same type of noodles as Mom but the Malaysians in Selangor use thicker yellow cylindrical-shaped noodles, which they called “Tai Lok Meen” in Cantonese. Mom would garnished the dish with crispy fried shallots, red-cut chillies, chopped scallions and cilantro and occasionally some crispy pork lard as she has become quite the health nut as she grow older, freaking out over anything she deemed as high cholesterol. Our family calls this dish “Boon Mee” which means braised/stewed noodles in Hokkien. To differentiate the dark soy-sauce braised and the “white” variety, we termed it Singapore Fried Hokkien Mee.

Below is Kuala Lumpur’s infamous Hokkien Mee or better known as Tai Lok Meen. Click on the pictures for some commentary.

Some time late last year, I was out with my cousin and he asked if I liked Hokkien Mee which is the common name for Fried Hokkien Prawn Mee a.k.a Sotong Mee (sotong is the Malay word for squid). I said I do like it and he brought me to this food centre which was packed during lunch hours. The food took some time to arrive. I supposed the uncle was letting the noodles sit in his wok to slowly absorb the seafood flavours from the stock. The uncle has been selling since 1968 so he knows what he is doing. The long queue and wait for the meal is a testament to his fare.

Food Centre at Blk 127, Lorong 1 Toa Payoh, Singapore 310127.

Food Centre at Blk 127, Lorong 1 Toa Payoh, Singapore 310127.

What we got in return for our patience were two plates of rich and tasty strands of noodles drenched in prawn and pork stock. The texture of the noodles by Italian standard would be considered way below “cottura” (the opposite of al dente). There was simply no resistance to the bite and one can slurp the gooey dish effortlessly and was dangerously bothering on being soggy.

Hokkien Mee or Fried Prawn Mee is easily is one of the big four (must eat noodles) of hawker favourites.

Hokkien Mee or Fried Prawn Mee is easily is one of the big four (must eat noodles) of hawker favourites.

In comparison to the other Fried Hokkien Mee I had before, Come Daily serves this dish extra moist. In fact, the presentation was sloppy but the look did not affect the overall taste although the lard was not crispy and the squid was too little to satisfy me. The bean sprouts had lost their crunchiness. I forgot how much my cousin paid for the meal but I remembered being a little shocked and finding it on the high side when he told me the price.

Lard, Pork Belly Strips, Prawns, Squid were used in the Coarse Vermicelli and Yellow Noodle dish.

Lard, Pork Belly Strips, Prawns, Squid were used in the Coarse Vermicelli and Yellow Noodle dish.

Taking the factors of taste, price, ambience (upkeep of the food centre), and service (waiting time) into consideration, in my humble opinion, it was definitely one of the better tasting ones but I would not go daily for this dish nor make the extra effort to go there just to eat it. It has somehow failed to wow me.

No matter how good the noodle dish is, it is not complete until we squeeze some fresh small lime and eat it with spicy sambal.

No matter how good the noodle dish is, it is not complete until we squeeze some fresh small lime and eat it with spicy sambal.

Come Daily Fried Hokkien Mee 天天来炒福建虾面

Come Daily Fried Hokkien Mee 天天来炒福建虾面

Come Daily Fried Hokkien Mee 天天来炒福建虾面
Address: #02-27, Blk 127,
Lorong 1 Toa Payoh,
Singapore 310127.

Tel:(+65) 6251 8542

Operating hours: Closed on Mondays
9.30am – 6pm

Happy eating :)

Click here to see my recipe for Singapore Fried Hokkien Mee.

Come Daily Fried Hokkien Mee 天天来炒福建虾面 I like to clear the term Fried Hokkien Mee. My mom is Hokkien and her fried Hokkien Mee is actually braised, very much like the Johor’s style which uses sliced pork (sometimes with pork ribs), small prawns, sliced squid, nappa cabbage or mustard greens with flat yellow egg noodles as shown in the picture below.
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So all the lovers were celebrating yesterday and I’m sure they are still high from the adoration for each other. Speaking of love, here’s a hawker’s love story…

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